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Mshindi, a Dallas Zoo chimp, spent his last day in the Dallas Zoo habitat eating a frozen treat on Jan. 10.(Juan Figueroa / Staff Photographer)

The team keeps a variety of formulas on hand so the team can replicate the mother’s milk for the infants if needed.

The milk “changes over the course of lactation,” Slifka said. “We try and match up protein, fat and energy with what we know about mom’s milk.”

Slifka used horse formula to mix bottles of milk when Wanda, a Hartmann’s mountain zebra, gave birth to a baby boy last month. Luckily, Wanda was able to nurse the foal herself.

Once animals are born, Slifka also comes up with a diet nama kebun binatang surabaya to support their growth through adulthood. The three lions born in 2020 and the three Sumatran tigers that were born in the past year, for example, still require specialized diets to support their development.

“[The lions] are growing really fast, so they’re actually getting more than the adults because they’re growing just like a teenager,” she said. “The same with our little tigers; they’re growing like crazy and going through a lot of food.”

‘It’s personal for us’

The zoo’s kitchen is similar to a restaurant in many ways. The zoo orders produce and meat from many of the same vendors, follows the same health and safety guidelines and faces many of the same challenges.

During the pandemic, one of the biggest difficulties for the team has been navigating supply-chain issues like those shoppers likely noticed at the grocery store. Food at the zoo is ordered months in advance, but roadblocks still happen.

Slifka said part of the job is coming up with multiple backup plans in case a food or ingredient can’t be delivered.

Profile Avatar
ratcliff
*******
*******, ******* *******
*******
******* ******* *******

Mshindi, a Dallas Zoo chimp, spent his last day in the Dallas Zoo habitat eating a frozen treat on Jan. 10.(Juan Figueroa / Staff Photographer)

The team keeps a variety of formulas on hand so the team can replicate the mother’s milk for the infants if needed.

The milk “changes over the course of lactation,” Slifka said. “We try and match up protein, fat and energy with what we know about mom’s milk.”

Slifka used horse formula to mix bottles of milk when Wanda, a Hartmann’s mountain zebra, gave birth to a baby boy last month. Luckily, Wanda was able to nurse the foal herself.

Once animals are born, Slifka also comes up with a diet nama kebun binatang surabaya to support their growth through adulthood. The three lions born in 2020 and the three Sumatran tigers that were born in the past year, for example, still require specialized diets to support their development.

“[The lions] are growing really fast, so they’re actually getting more than the adults because they’re growing just like a teenager,” she said. “The same with our little tigers; they’re growing like crazy and going through a lot of food.”

‘It’s personal for us’

The zoo’s kitchen is similar to a restaurant in many ways. The zoo orders produce and meat from many of the same vendors, follows the same health and safety guidelines and faces many of the same challenges.

During the pandemic, one of the biggest difficulties for the team has been navigating supply-chain issues like those shoppers likely noticed at the grocery store. Food at the zoo is ordered months in advance, but roadblocks still happen.

Slifka said part of the job is coming up with multiple backup plans in case a food or ingredient can’t be delivered.